Preparation for viewing Rabbit Proof Fence


Reading 1
Leaping The Fence Of Australia's Past http://www.iofilm.co.uk/feats/interviews/r/rabbit_proof_fence_2002.shtml


Rabbit Proof Fence U-Tube

Preview Reflection

Answer the following questions:
  1. What do you expect the film to be about? Summarize the story of Rabbit Proof Fence in no more than 2 sentences.
  2. What is your reaction to the knowledge that in 1930s Australia, children could be taken away from their parents? Explain.
  3. Suggest one reason why the government might have done this.

After Viewing Reflection

Review your answers to the Pre-Viewing Questions you did before you saw the movie. Here are those questions again, just to refresh your memories:
  • What do you expect the film to be about? Summarize what you expect to see in the story of Rabbit Proof Fence in 1 or 2 sentences.
  • What is your reaction to the knowledge that in 1930s Australia, children could be taken away from their parents? Explain in 1 sentence
  • Suggest one reason why the government might have done this.

Post-viewing reflection (~ 20 minutes)

Now answer the following questions in your notebook/binder. Paragraph answers are required.
  1. How did you feel when you watched the removal scene? This is the scene where the girls were taken away at the beginning of the movie. Describe your reactions and thoughts and explain them.
  2. What reason/s did the movie give for the government’s actions? Make sure you explain fully.
  3. Is the government the ‘bad guy’ in this movie? Explain fully.

Standards and Benchmarks:

  • Making inferences and drawing conclusions based on implicit and explicit information
  • Making connections between key ideas, arguments and perspectives
  • Using predictions and personal experiences to interpret the film
  • Evaluating proposition-and-support patterns in persuasive ‘text’


Worksheets on Rabbit Proof Fence







Rabbit Proof Fence and the Art of Cinema

Glossary of commonly used filming terms. (p.172-3) Houston, M. English: Year 9 Study Guide ESA Publications (NZ) Ltd.

Making sense of the film

Film structure
Rising action, climax

Plot development
What are the conflicts in the movie?
Extent to which conflicts are addressed and resolved

Character Development
Molly, Gracie and Daisy’s stories
How a character is developed

Themes for investigation
  • Importance of family
  • Personal identity
  • Cultural identity
  • Displacement/alienation
  • Belonging

Evaluate:
  • Coherence
  • Logic

Identify:
  • Idioms
  • Analogies
  • Metaphors
  • Similes
  • Literal and figurative meanings
  • Symbolism

Identify the message of the film




Cinematic Techniques (Worksheet) Scene analysis

Close viewing (Houston, page 178)

Below is an excerpt from a documentary on the making of Rabbit Proof Fence, showing the filming of the forced removal scene.





http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gP7DCG31OJM

Task
We will look at the forced removal scene more closely in class. As you watch it, comment briefly on each of the following:

Action:
Speed
Climax

Setting:
Where
When

Language:
Dialogue
Voice over (if used)

Sound:
Music
Other sounds

Cinematography: tick the techniques used
  • Angles
  • Panning
  • Zooming
  • Tracking
  • Colour
  • Contrast

Special effects:
Were there any special effects? Why/why not?

Literary Elements

Just as a movie has a theme, a setting and a mood so does a piece of literature. What are some of the literary elements that we have learned this year?
In your groups look up your literary element in the literature books. Look at both the definitions on pages to AND on the specific page I have given you. Now come up with YOUR OWN definition and write it neatly at the top of the paper with a marker. Underneath draw a picture or diagram that represents the element. These will be posted around the room so be sure to write neatly.

Pages in Literature Book:
  • General- 744-745 and 752-764
  • Plot- 17 and 724
  • Setting- 37 and 104
  • Theme- 132
  • Characterization- 148
  • Mood- 361
  • Conflict- 567
  • Climax- 608
  • Imagery- 708

Elements:

Theme

Plot

Conflict

Setting

Mood

Imagery

Characterization

Point of View



Page created by Ms. Leong, Adapted by Ms. Muench